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Guide to Acknowledging First Peoples & Traditional Territory

“Infinity” © Christi Belcourt

The following document offers the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) recommended territorial acknowledgement for institutions where our members work, organized by province.  While most of these campuses are included, the list will gradually become more complete as we learn more about specific traditional territories. When requested, we have also included acknowledgements for other post-secondary institutions as well.

We wish to emphasize that this is a guide, not a script. We are recommending the acknowledgements that have been developed by local university-based Indigenous councils or advisory groups, where possible. In other places, where there are multiple territorial acknowledgements that exist for one area or the acknowledgements are contested, the multiple acknowledgements are provided. This is an evolving, working guide.

 

How to use this guide

The goal of this guide is to encourage all academic staff association representatives and members to acknowledge the First Peoples on whose traditional territories we live and work. This acknowledgement appropriately takes place at the commencement of courses, meetings or conferences, and presentations (given either at one’s home institution or elsewhere).

Acknowledging territory shows recognition of and respect for Aboriginal Peoples. It is recognition of their presence both in the past and the present. Recognition and respect are essential elements of establishing healthy, reciprocal relations. These relationships are key to reconciliation, a process to which CAUT is committed.

While acknowledging territory is very welcome, it is only a small part of cultivating strong relationships with the First Peoples of Canada. Acknowledging territory and First Peoples should take place within the larger context of genuine and ongoing work to forge real understanding, and to challenge the legacies of colonialism. Territorial acknowledgements should not simply be a pro forma statement made before getting on with the “real business” of the meeting; they must be understood as a vital part of the business.[1]

CAUT strongly encourages academic staff associations to reach out to local Indigenous communities to open pathways for dialogue, specifically to discuss the wording of the acknowledgement. This is important to ensure that it is both respectful and representative, as acknowledgments sometimes change, or specific communities are given prominence depending on the context or the audience in attendance. Also, given that there is no single standard orthography for traditional Indigenous names, this can be an opportunity to ensure correct pronunciation of Indigenous community or nation names.

The recognition of Métis presence and nationhood is also essential. While the Métis are acknowledged in some of the territorial acknowledgements listed below, this aspect of the Guide needs to be developed. We therefore ask that, in consultation with local Métis associations, you include acknowledgement of Métis People where appropriate.

  1. For more about what meaningfully acknowledging First Peoples entails, please take a look at the following article:  http://www.megaphonemagazine.com/ unceded_territory.

Our Process

This document has been reviewed by CAUT’s Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education Working Group and much effort has been made to ensure that it is accurate. We would also like to thank the many members of CAUT’s listserv for Aboriginal Academic Staff who have provided generous and valuable feedback in the development of this guide.

Many of the acknowledgements have been developed solely through consulting written documents, such as treaty maps and texts. Community consultation remains essential. We would very much appreciate suggested edits. Please contact CAUT with any suggested changes or additions.

 

Acknowledgement statements

Newfoundland and Labrador

Memorial University (St. John's) -  

1/ I [we] would like to respectfully acknowledge the territory in which we gather, as the ancestral unceded homelands of the Beothuk and the island of Newfoundland as the ancestral unceded homelands of the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk.

2/ I [we] would like to respectfully acknowledge the territory in which we gather, as the ancestral home-lands of the Beothuk and the island of Newfoundland as the ancestral homelands of the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk. I (we) would also like to recognize the Inuit of Nunatsiavut and NunatuKavut and the Innu of Nitassinan, and their ancestors, as the original people of Labrador. We strive for respectful partnerships with all the peoples of this province as we search for collective healing and true reconciliation and honour this beautiful land together.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Office of Aboriginal Affairs, Memorial University

Memorial University of Newfoundland Grenfell Campus (Corner Brook)

1/ I [we] would like to respectfully acknowledge that the land on which we gather is in traditional unceded Mi’kmaw territory.

2/ I [we] would like to respectfully acknowledge that the land on which we gather is in traditional Mi’kmaw territory, and we acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of all the Mi’kmaw, Innu, and Inuit Peoples of this province.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Office of Aboriginal Affairs, Memorial University

Prince Edward Island

University of Prince Edward Island (Charlottetown) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of the Abegweit Mi’kmaq First Nation.

Nova Scotia

Acadia University (Wolfville) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki , the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Atlantic School of Theology (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki , the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Cape Breton University (Sydney) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Dalhousie University (Halifax)

1/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

2/ Dalhousie University sits on the Traditional Territory of the Mi’kmaq. We are all Treaty people.

—   Official university acknowledgement provided by Executive Director, Diversity and Inclusiveness, Dalhousie University

Mount Saint Vincent University (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Saint Mary’s University (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

St. Francis Xavier University (Antigonish) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université Sainte-Anne (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université Sainte-Anne (Petit-de-Grat) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université Sainte-Anne (Pointe –de-l’Église) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université Sainte-Anne (Saint-Joseph-du-Moine) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université Sainte-Anne (Tusket) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1725. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

University of King’s College (Halifax) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) People first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

New Brunswick

Mount Allison University (Sackville) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

St. Thomas University (Fredericton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq, Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Passamaquoddy Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship of peace, friendship, and mutual respect between nations for two very different modes of life and land use.

Université de Moncton (Moncton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université de Moncton (Edmundston) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Université de Moncton (Shippagan) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

University of New Brunswick (Fredericton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

University of New Brunswick (St. John’s) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) and Mi’kmaq Peoples first signed with the British crown in 1726. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Quebec

Bishop’s University (Sherbrooke) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of the Abenaki people and the Wabenaki confederacy.

Concordia University (Montréal) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of the Kanien’keha:ka (Mohawk), a place which has long served as a site of meeting and exchange amongst nations.

McGill University (Montréal) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of the Kanien’keha:ka (Mohawk), a place which has long served as a site of meeting and exchange amongst nations.

Université Laval (Québec) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory unceded territory of the Abenaki and Wabenaki Confederacy and the Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet).

Ontario

Algoma University (Sault Ste. Marie) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and that the land on which we are gathered is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg, specifically the Garden River and Batchewana First Nations, as well as Métis People.

Algonquin College (Ottawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg People.

Brescia University College (London) - We [I] would like to acknowledge the history of the traditional territory on which this university stands. We [I] would also like to respect the longstanding relationships of the three local First Nations groups of this land and place in Southwestern Ontario.

The Attawandaran (Neutral) Peoples once settled this region alongside the Algonquin and Haudenosaunee peoples, and used this land as their traditional beaver hunting grounds.

The three other longstanding Indigenous groups of this geographic region are:  the Anishinaabe Peoples (also referred to as the Three Fires Confederacy including; Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatami Nations);  the Haudenosaunee Peoples (also known as the Iroquoian people or Six Nations including Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscorora); and, the Leni-Lunaape Peoples (also referred to as the Delaware and/or Munsee).

The three First Nations communities closest in proximity to [this] university are:  Chippewa of the Thames First Nation (part of the Anishinaabe);  Oneida Nation of the Thames (part of the Haudenosaunee);  and, Munsee-Delaware Nation (part of the Leni-Lunaape)

—  Indigenous Services, University of Western Ontario

Brock University (St. Catharines) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Cambrian College (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Canadore College (North Bay) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg People and, specifically, the Nipissing First Nation.

Carleton University (Ottawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg people.

Centennial College (Scarborough) - [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Williams Treaties of 1923 and applies to lands east of Woodbine Avenue.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the Scugog, Hiawatga, and Alderville First Nation.

Collège Boréal (Hearst) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Ojibwe/ Chippewa, Oji-Cree, Mushkegowuk (Cree), Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

Collège Boréal (Kapuskasing) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Ojibwe/ Chippewa, Oji-Cree, Mushkegowuk (Cree), Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

Collège Boréal (Nippissing) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg People and, specifically, the Nipissing First Nation.

Collège Boréal (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Collège Boréal (Temiskaming) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Cree, Ojibway, and Algonquin Peoples.

Collège Boréal (Timmins) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Ojibwe/Chippewa, Mushkegowuk (Cree), Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

Collège Boréal (Toronto) [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Conestoga College (Kitchener) - We [I] would like to acknowledge that we are on the the Haldimand Tract, land promised to the Haudenosaunee people of Six Nations, which includes six miles on each side of the Grand River. This territory is the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Confederation College (Thunder Bay) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Superior Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg and the Métis.

Durham College (Oshawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

Fanshawe College (London) - We [I] would like to acknowledge the history of the traditional territory on which this university stands. We [I] would also like to respect the longstanding relationships of the three local First Nations groups of this land and place in Southwestern Ontario.

The Attawandaran (Neutral) peoples once settled this region alongside the Algonquin and Haudenosaunee peoples, and used this land as their traditional beaver hunting grounds.

The three other longstanding Indigenous groups of this geographic region are: the Anishinaabe Peoples (also referred to as the Three Fires Confederacy including; Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatami Nations);  the Haudenosaunee Peoples (also known as the Iroquoian people or Six Nations including Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscorora); and, the Leni-Lunaape Peoples (also referred to as the Delaware and/or Munsee).

The three First Nations communities closest in proximity to this University are: Chippewa of the Thames First Nation (part of the Anishinaabe); Oneida Nation of the Thames (part of the Haudenosaunee); and, Munsee-Delaware Nation (part of the Leni-Lunaape).

—   Indigenous Services, University of Western Ontario

Fleming College (Peterborough) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe Mississauga adjacent to Haudenosaunee Territory and in the territory covered by the Williams Treaty. Each day we greet and honour the original inhabitants of the land.

Georgian College (Barrie) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Haudenosaunee, Anishnaabeg Peoples. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties.

George Brown College (Toronto)[The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Humber College (Toronto) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is in Adobigok (which means Place of the Alders in the Ojibwe Language). It is uniquely situated along the Humber River watershed, which historically provided an integral connection for aboriginal peoples between the lakeshore of Ontario and the Lake Simcoe-Georgian Bay region. This area falls within the traditional territory of the Wendat, Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee Peoples.

—   Shelley Charles, Elder, Advisor of Aboriginal Relations, Humber College

Huntington University (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Huron University College (London) - We [I] would like to acknowledge the history of the traditional territory on which this university stands. We [I] would also like to respect the longstanding relationships of the three local First Nations groups of this land and place in Southwestern Ontario.

The Attawandaran (Neutral) peoples once settled this region alongside the Algonquin and Haudenosaunee peoples, and used this land as their traditional beaver hunting grounds.

The three other longstanding Indigenous groups of this geographic region are: the Anishinaabe Peoples (also referred to as the Three Fires Confederacy including; Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatami Nations);  the Haudenosaunee Peoples (also known as the Iroquoian people or Six Nations including Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscorora); and, the Leni-Lunaape Peoples (also referred to as the Delaware and/or Munsee).

The three First Nations communities closest in proximity to this University are: Chippewa of the Thames First Nation (part of the Anishinaabe); Oneida Nation of the Thames (part of the Haudenosaunee); and, Munsee-Delaware Nation (part of the Leni-Lunaape).

—   Indigenous Services, University of Western Ontario

King’s University College (London) - We [I] would like to acknowledge the history of the traditional territory on which this university stands.

We [I] would also like to respect the longstanding relationships of the three local First Nations groups of this land and place in Southwestern Ontario.

The Attawandaran (Neutral) peoples once settled this region alongside the Algonquin and Haudenosaunee peoples, and used this land as their traditional beaver hunting grounds.

The three other longstanding Indigenous groups of this geographic region are: the Anishinaabe Peoples (also referred to as the Three Fires Confederacy including; Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatami Nations); the Haudenosaunee Peoples (also known as the Iroquoian people or Six Nations including Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscorora); and, the Leni-Lunaape Peoples (also referred to as the Delaware and/or Munsee).

The three First Nations communities closest in proximity to this University are: Chippewa of the Thames First Nation (part of the Anishinaabe); Oneida Nation of the Thames (part of the Haudenosaunee); and, Munsee-Delaware Nation (part of the Leni-Lunaape)

—   Indigenous Services, University of Western Ontario

La Cité Collégiale (Ottawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg People.

Lakehead University (Thunder Bay) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Superior Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg and the Métis.

Lakehead University (Orillia) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg, specifically Ojibwe/Chippewa people. This is Williams Treaty territory.

Lambton College (Sarnia) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg, specifically the Aamjiwnaang First Nation.

Lambton College (Toronto) - [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Williams Treaties of 1923 and applies to lands east of Woodbine Avenue.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the Scugog, Hiawatga, and Alderville First Nation.

Laurentian University (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Loyalist  College (Belleville) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosaunee Peoples and directly adjacent to the Kanien’keha:ka (Mohawk) community of Tyendinaga.

Loyalist  College (Bancroft) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishnaabeg Peoples.

McMaster University (Hamilton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement and is directly adjacent to Haldiman Treaty territory.

Mohawk College (Hamilton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement and is directly adjacent to Haldiman Treaty territory.

Niagara College (Welland) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement and is directly adjacent to Haldiman Treaty territory.

Nipissing University (North Bay) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg people and, specifically, the Nipissing First Nation.

Nipissing University (Brantford) - We [I] would like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosaunee Peopless. Brantford is situated on the Haldimand Tract, land promised to Six Nations, which includes six miles on each side of the Grand River.

Northern College (Haileybury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Cree, Ojibway, and Algonquin Peoples.

Northern College (Kirkland Lake) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Cree, Ojibway, and Algonquin Peoples.

Northern College (Moosonee) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Mushkegowuk (Cree), Ojibwe/Chippewa, Oji-Cree, Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

Northern College (Timmins) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Ojibwe/Chippewa, Mushkegowuk (Cree), Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

Northern Ontario School of Medicine (Thunder Bay) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson Superior Treaty territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg and the Métis.

Northern Ontario School of Medicine (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Ontario College of Art and Design (Toronto)[The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Osgoode Hall Law School (Toronto) - [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Queen’s University (Kingston) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Royal Military College of Canada (Kingston) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Ryerson University (Toronto)[The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

1/ Toronto and Ryerson University are in the “Dish With One Spoon Territory.” The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous Nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers, have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.

—   Acknowledgement provided by the Aboriginal Education Council at Ryerson University

2/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

St. Clair College (Windsor) - We [I] would like to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Three Fires confederacy of First Nations, comprised of the Ojibway, the Odawa, and the Potawatomie.

St. Jerome’s University (Waterloo) - We [I] would like to acknowledge that we are on the the Haldimand Tract, land promised to the Haudenosaunee people of Six Nations, which includes six miles on each side of the Grand River. This territory is the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Saint Paul University (Ottawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional (unceded) Algonquin territory.

St. Lawrence College (Brockville) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Wendat, Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

St. Lawrence College (Cornwall) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples, specifically the Kanien’keha:ka (Mohawk).

St. Lawrence College (Kingston) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee Peoples.

Sault College (Sault Ste. Marie) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and that the land on which we are gathered is the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg, specifically the Garden River and Batchewana First Nations, as well as Métis People.

Seneca College (Toronto) [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Sheridan College (Brampton) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement.

Sheridan College (Mississauga) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement.

Sheridan College (Oakville) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement.

Thorneloe University (Sudbury) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

Trent University (Oshawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

Trent University (Peterborough) - We [I] respectfully acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of the Mississauga Anishinaabeg. We offer our gratitude to our First Nations for their care for, and teachings about, our earth and our relations. May we honour those teachings.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Trent University Faculty Association

Université de Hearst - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 9 territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Ojibwe/ Chippewa, Oji-Cree, Mushkegowuk (Cree), Algonquin, and Métis Peoples.

University of Guelph - 

1/ We would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishinaabeg, Haudenasaunee and Métis Peoples.

2/ We would like to acknowledge the Attawandaron people on whose traditional territory the University of Guelph resides and offer our respect to our Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Métis neighbours as we strive to strengthen our relationships with them. 

We recognize the significance of the Dish with One Spoon Covenant to this land.  The Dish with One Spoon Covenant is a peace agreement made between Indigenous nations before the Europeans arrived.  It characterizes our collective responsibility to each other and Mother Earth - we should take only what we need, leave enough for others and keep the dish clean. 

Today, this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our important connection to this land where we learn and work.

—   The Aboriginal Resource Centre at Guelph University

University of Ontario Institute of Technology (Oshawa) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

University of Ottawa - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg People.

University of Sudbury - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Robinson-Huron Treaty territory and the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Atikameksheng Anishnaabeg.

University of Toronto (Toronto) - [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

1/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

2/ I (we) wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Assistant Vice-President & Chief of Protocol, Office of President, University of Toronto

University of Toronto (Scarborough)[The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Williams Treaties of 1923 and applies to lands east of Woodbine Avenue.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

1/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of  the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the Scugog, Hiawatga, and Alderville First Nation.

2/ I (we) wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Assistant Vice-President & Chief of Protocol, Office of President, University of Toronto

University of Toronto (Mississauga) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, is within the lands protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement.

University of Waterloo - We [I] would like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosaunee Peoples. The University of Waterloo is situated on the Haldimand Tract, land promised to Six Nations, which includes six miles on each side of the Grand River.

University of Western Ontario (London) - We [I] would like to acknowledge the history of the traditional territory on which this university stands. We [I] would also like to respect the longstanding relationships of the three local First Nations groups of this land and place in Southwestern Ontario.

The Attawandaran (Neutral) peoples once settled this region alongside the Algonquin and Haudenosaunee peoples, and used this land as their traditional beaver hunting grounds.

The three other longstanding Indigenous groups of this geographic region are:  the Anishinaabe Peoples (also referred to as the Three Fires Confederacy including; Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatami Nations); the Haudenosaunee Peoples (also known as the Iroquoian people or Six Nations including Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscorora); and, the Leni-Lunaape Peoples (also referred to as the Delaware and/or Munsee).

The three First Nations communities closest in proximity to this University are: Chippewa of the Thames First Nation (part of the Anishinaabe); Oneida Nation of the Thames (part of the Haudenosaunee); and, Munsee-Delaware Nation (part of the Leni-Lunaape)

—   Indigenous Services, University of Western Ontario

University of Windsor - The University of Windsor sits on the Traditional territory of the Three Fires confederacy of First Nations, comprised of the Ojibway, the Odawa, and the Potawatomie.

—   Acknowledgement provided by the Aboriginal Education Centre, University of Windsor

Wilfrid Laurier University (Kitchener-Waterloo) - We would like to acknowledge that we are on the Haldimand Tract, traditional territory of the Attawandaron (Neutral), Anishnaabeg, and Haudenosauonee peoples.

—   Acknowledgement provided by Office of the Vice-President: Academic & Provost

York University (Toronto) - [The treaty that was signed for this particular parcel of land is collectively referred to as the Toronto Purchase and applies to land east of Brown’s Line to Woodbine Avenue and north towards Newmarket.]

—   Toronto District School Board, Aboriginal Education Centre

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishnaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Manitoba

Brandon University - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 2 territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Assiniboine, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and the homeland of the Métis Nation. The First Nations communities of Treaty 2 are: Dauphin River, Ebb & Flow, Keeseekoowenin, Lake St. Martin, Lake Manitoba, Little Saskatchewan, O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi, Pinaymootang and Skownan.

St. John’s College (Winnipeg) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 1 territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and the homeland of the Métis Nation.

Université de Saint-Boniface (Winnipeg) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 1 territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and the homeland of the Métis Nation.

University College of the North (The Pas) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Cree, Inninnowuk, Dene, Saulteax, Oji-Cree, Anishinabe and Métis.

University of Manitoba (Winnipeg)

1/ The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. We respect the Treaties that were made on these territories, we acknowledge the harms and mistakes of the past, and we dedicate ourselves to move forward in partnership with Indigenous communities in a spirit of reconciliation and collaboration.

—   Office of Indigenous Achievement at University of Manitoba

2/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 1 territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and the homeland of the Métis Nation.

University of Winnipeg - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 1 territory and that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene Peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation.

Saskatchewan

St. Thomas More College (Saskatoon) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory, the traditional territory of Cree Peoples, and the homeland of the Métis Nation.

University of Regina - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is Treaty 4 and Treaty 6 territory and the traditional territory of the Cree and Saulteaux, Assiniboine and Métis.

University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon)

1/ As we gather here today, we acknowledge we are on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nation and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

—   Acknowledgement developed by Indigenous faculty and staff at University of Saskatchewan

2/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory, the traditional territory of Cree Peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation.

Alberta

Alberta College of Art & Design (Calgary) - I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

Athabasca University - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are in Treaty 6 territory, the traditional territory of the Plains Cree, Woodland Cree, Beaver Cree, Saulteaux, Niisitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, and Nakota Sioux Peoples.

Bow Valley College (Calgary) - I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

Concordia University College (Edmonton)We [I] wish to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory and a traditional meeting ground and home for many Indigenous Peoples, including Cree, Saulteaux, Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, and Nakota Sioux Peoples.

Grant MacEwan University (Edmonton)We [I] wish to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory and a traditional meeting ground and home for many Indigenous Peoples, including Cree, Saulteaux, Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, and Nakota Sioux Peoples.

Lethbridge College - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the Treaty 7 territory and the traditional territory of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Nakoda (Stoney), and Tsuut'ina.

Mount Royal University (Calgary) - We [I] would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

NorQuest College (Edmonton) - I would like to begin by acknowledging that we are on the traditional lands, referred to as Treaty 6 Territory and that the City of Edmonton and all the people here are beneficiaries of this peace and friendship treaty. Treaty 6 encompasses the traditional territories of numerous western Canadian First Nations, including Cree, Dene (DEN–Ē), Stoney Nakota Sioux, Saulteaux (SO-TO), and Ojibwe (OJIB-WĒ). NorQuest College is dedicated to ensuring that the spirit of Treaty 6 is honoured and respected.

—  Acknowledgment provided by Director, Strategic Integration & Stakeholder Relations NorQuest College.  (You can find an audio recording of this acknowledgement here.)

Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (Edmonton) We [I] wish to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory and a traditional meeting ground and home for many Indigenous Peoples, including Cree, Saulteaux, Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, and Nakota Sioux Peoples.

Olds College - We [I] would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations. The area is also home to Metis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

Red Deer College - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is located in the meeting place of Treaty 7 and Treaty 6 regions. This area is the traditional territory of the Niisitapi (Blackfoot), (including the Siksika, the Piikuni, and the Kainai Peoples), the Tsuut’ina,  Stoney Nakoda, Cree, Saulteaux and Métis peoples.

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (Calgary) - We [I] would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

St. Mary’s University (Calgary) - We [I] would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

University of Alberta (Edmonton)

1/ We [I] wish to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is Treaty 6 territory and a traditional meeting ground and home for many Indigenous Peoples, including Cree, Saulteaux, Niisitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, and Nakota Sioux.

2/ Welcome to the University of Alberta. I would like to begin by acknowledging the Traditional Territory on which we are gathered today, a welcoming place for peoples from around the world. I would like to acknowledge and thank the diverse Indigenous peoples whose footsteps have marked this territory for centuries such as: Cree, Saulteaux, Niisitapi (Blackfoot), Métis, Nakota Sioux.

— Endorsed on May 1, 2012 by the uAlberta Council on Aboriginal Initiatives

University of Alberta, Augustana Campus (Camrose) We [I] wish to acknowledge the territory on which the Augustana Campus of the University of Alberta is located provided a travelling route and home to the Cree, Blackfoot, and Métis, as it did for the Nakoda, Tsuu T’ina, Chipewyan, and other Indigenous Peoples. Their spiritual and practical relationships to the land create a rich heritage for our learning and our life as a community.

—  Aboriginal Student Offices, University of AlbertaAugustana Campus

University of Calgary -

Basic Acknowledgement - I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

Specific Tribal Territorial Acknowledgement - I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

Extended Acknowledgement - I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the Blackfoot and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina, and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations. I would also like to note that the University of Calgary is situated on land adjacent to where the Bow River meets the Elbow River, and that the traditional Blackfoot name of this place is “Mohkinstsis” which we now call the City of Calgary. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

— Acknowledgment provided by Director of Indigenous Education Initiatives, University of Calgary

University of Lethbridge - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the Treaty 7 territory and the traditional territory of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Nakoda (Stoney), and Tsuut'ina.

British Columbia

British Columbia Institute of Technology (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are fortunate to be able to gather on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish People.

— Executive Director of Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships

British Columbia Institute of Technology (Burnaby) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are fortunate to be able to gather on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish People.

— Executive Director of Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships

Camosun College (Victoria) - 

1/ Camosun College serves the communities of southern Vancouver Island and the south Gulf Islands that are located in the traditional territories of the Lkwungen (Esquimalt and Songhees), Malahat, Pacheedaht, Scia’new, T’Sou-ke and W̱SÁNEĆ (Pauquachin, Tsartlip, Tsawout, Tseycum) peoples. We acknowledge our traditional hosts and honour their welcome and graciousness to the students who seek knowledge here.

— Acknowledgment provided by the Director of Indigenous Education & Community Connections, Camosun College

2/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that land on which we gather is within the traditional territories of the Lkwungen (Esquimalt, and Songhees), Malahat, Pacheedaht, Scia’new, T’Sou-ke and W̱SÁNEĆ (Pauquachin, Tsartlip, Tsawout, Tseycum) peoples.

Camosun College (Saanich) - 

1/ Camosun College serves the communities of southern Vancouver Island and the south Gulf Islands that are located in the traditional territories of the Lkwungen (Esquimalt and Songhees), Malahat, Pacheedaht, Scia’new, T’Sou-ke and W̱SÁNEĆ (Pauquachin, Tsartlip, Tsawout, Tseycum) peoples. We acknowledge our traditional hosts and honour their welcome and graciousness to the students who seek knowledge here.

— Acknowledgment provided by the Director of Indigenous Education & Community Connections, Camosun College

2/ We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that land on which we gather is within the traditional territories of the Lkwungen (Esquimalt, and Songhees), Malahat, Pacheedaht, Scia’new, T’Sou-ke and W̱SÁNEĆ (Pauquachin, Tsartlip, Tsawout, Tseycum) peoples.

Capilano University (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples,[1] including the territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō  and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

College of New Caledonia (Prince George) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Lheidli T'enneh.

College of the Rockies (Cranbrook) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Ktunaxa and  Kinbasket Peoples. Five First Nations bands are located in the regional boundary of the College. Four bands are Ktunaxa and one is Secwepemc (Shuswap). We are grateful to have the opportunity to work in in this territory.

Douglas College (New Westminster) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the QayQayt First Nation.

Emily Carr University of Art & Design (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples,[2] including the territories of  the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō  and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

Kwantlen Polytechnic University (Surrey) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of Coast Salish Peoples,[3] specifically the Kwantlen, Katzie, Semiahmoo, and Tsawwassen First Nations.

Langara College (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples,[4] including the territories of  the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō  and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

Nicola Valley Institute of Technology (Merritt) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Syilx (Okanagan) Peoples.

Nicola Valley Institute of Technology (Burnaby) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is within the shared traditional territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish), Tsleil-Waututh, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) First Nations.

North Island College (Courtenay) - We [I] would like to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the K’ómoks First Nation, including Sathloot, Sasitla, leeksun, Puledge, Cha’chae, and Tat’poos Peoples. 

Northwest Community College (Prince Rupert)[All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Tsimshian people of the Allied Tribes of Lax Kw’alaams and Metlakatla on whose traditional territory this meeting will take place.

Northwest Community College (Terrace) [All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Tsimshian people of Kitsumkalum, especially the Laxgibuu Clan on whose traditional territory this meeting will take place.

Northwest Community College (Kitimat) - [All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Haisla people of Kitamaat Village on whose traditional territory this meeting will take place.

Northwest Community College (Hazelton) - [All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Gitxsan people for being on the traditional territory of Nikateen where this meeting will take place.

Northwest Community College (Smithers)[All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Wet'suwet'en people on whose traditional territory this meeting will take place.

Northwest Community College (Houston)[All campuses of Northwest Community College (NWCC) serve seven First Nations in northwest British Columbia: Haida, Tsimshian, Nisga'a, Haisla, Gitxsan, Wet'suwet'en, and Tahltan and acknowledges the traditional territory its campuses reside on.]

— First Nations Council, Northwest Community College

We [I] would like to being by acknowledging the Wet’suwet’en people of the Laksilyu Clan on whose traditional territory this meeting will take place.

Okanagan College (Kelowna) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Syilx (Okanagan) Peoples.

Royal Roads University (Victoria) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we gathered on the ancestral lands of the Xwsepsum (Esquimalt) and Lkwungen (Songhees) who shared traditional land resources with neighboring families of Scia’new (Beecher Bay), T’Sou-ke (Sooke) Nations, and many others.

Selkirk College (Castlegar) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Ktunaxa , Syilx (Okanagan), and Sinixt Peoples.

Simon Fraser University (Burnaby) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Coast Salish Peoples,[5] specifically the shared traditional territories of the  Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish), Tsleil-Waututh, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) First Nations.

— Acknowledgement provided by Director, Office for Aboriginal Peoples, Simon Fraser University

Simon Fraser University (Surrey) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of Coast Salish Peoples,[6] specifically the Kwantlen, Semiahmoo, Tsawwassen, Katzie, Kwantlen, Kwikwetlem, Qayqayt, and numerous Stó:lō Nations First Nations.

— Acknowledgement provided by Director, Office for Aboriginal Peoples, Simon Fraser University

Simon Fraser University (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples,[7] including the territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō  and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

— Acknowledgement provided by Director, Office for Aboriginal Peoples, Simon Fraser University

Thompson Rivers University (Kamloops) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located in the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc territory that is situated in the southern interior of British Columbia within the unceded traditional lands of the Secwepemc Nation.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (Williams Lake) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on T’exelcemc territory.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (100 Mile House) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on Tsq’escenemc territory.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (Ashcroft) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on Ashcroft First Nation territory (Nlak’pamux Nation).

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (Barriere) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on Simpcw territory.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (Clearwater) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on Simpcw territory.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

Thompson Rivers University (Lillooet) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land is located on the St’at’imc Nation territory that includes Bridge River (Nxwisten), Pavilion (Ts’kw’aylacw), Cayoose Creek (Sekw’el’was), Mount Currie (Lil’wat), Seton Lake (Chalath), Lillooet (T’it’q’et), Fountain (Xaxl’ip), Anderson Lake (N’quatqua), Douglas (Xa’xtsa), Skatin and Samahquam.

— Acknowledgement provided by Thompson River University Faculty Association

University of British Columbia (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples,[8] including the territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō  and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus (Kelowna) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the unceded territory of the Syilx (Okanagan) Peoples.

University of British Columbia, Point Grey Campus (Vancouver) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam) People.

University of the Fraser Valley (Abbotsford) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional and unceded territory of the Stó:lō.

University of Northern British Columbia (Prince George) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Lheidli T'enneh.

University of Victoria - We [I] We acknowledge and respect the Lekwungen-speaking Peoples on whose traditional territories the university stands and the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSANEC peoples whose historical relationships with the land continue to this day.

— Acknowledgement provided by the Director, Indigenous Academic & Community Engagement, First Peoples’ House, University of Victoria (The Office of Indigenous Academic & Community Engagement continues to work with the six local First Nations as part of the process of revising the University’s land acknowledgement (above) to express most appropriately our respect for the peoples’ on whose land we live, work and study.)

Vancouver Community College - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are on the traditional and unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples, the traditional territories of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations.

— Acknowledgement provided by the Vancouver Community College, Office VP Academic & Research

Vancouver Island University (Nanaimo) - We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that we are on the traditional and unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples, the traditional territories of the Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) First Nations.

It should be noted that this is linguistic terminology, referring to the Coast Salish language family. This language family encompasses many First Nations whose traditional territory is found on Vancouver Island and in the United States.

 

2. See “Pronunciation Guide For Indigenous Communities in BC”: http://bannockandbutter.tumblr.com/post/31780109220/pron unciation-guide-for-indigenous-communities-in
3. It should be noted that this is linguistic terminology, referring to the Coast Salish language family. This language family encompasses many First Nations whose traditional territory is found on Vancouver Island and in the United States.
4. Ibid
5. Ibid
6. Ibid
7. Ibid
8. Ibid
9. Ibid
10. Ibid
11. Ibid